Does Your Employee Have a Potential Lawsuit Against You For Discrimination?

There are several federal laws in association with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) that protect employees from being discriminated against in the workplace based upon race, color, national origin, religion, sex, disability, age, citizenship status, and genetic information.

Heather Meglino
December 18, 2017

There are several federal laws in association with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) that protect employees from being discriminated against in the workplace based upon race, color, national origin, religion, sex, disability, age, citizenship status, and genetic information. These laws also prohibit employers from retaliating against employees who bring these types of claims against their employer. These laws include:

 

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964:

This act prohibits employers from discriminating against employees based on their sex, race, color, national origin, and religion.

 

Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978:

Amends Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to prohibit sex discrimination on the basis of pregnancy, childbirth, or any other medical condition associated with pregnancy or childbirth.

 

The Equal Pay Act of 1963:

Prohibits sex discrimination with regard to pay. This act requires the employer to pay both men and women equal wages if the same type of work is performed by the individuals.

 

Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990:

Prohibits employers from discriminating against qualified individuals with disabilities in job application procedures, hiring, firing, advancement, compensation, job training, and other terms, conditions, and privileges of employment.

 

The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008:

Prohibits discrimination against applicants or employees based on their genetic information such as a genetic disease or disorder discovered by the employer with respect to health insurance and employment.

 

In addition to the federal discrimination laws stated above, Florida has its own employment discrimination laws found in Section 760.10 of the Florida Statutes. These laws prohibit employers from discriminating against employees based on their race, color, religion, sex, pregnancy, national origin, age, disability or marital status. An employee has 365 days of the alleged discriminatory act in order to file a discrimination claim against your business.

 

If you feel that your employee may file a discrimination claim against your company or have any questions regarding a potential discrimination lawsuit, please contact Meglino Law at (407) 900-7440.

About The Author
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Heather M. Meglino is the owner at Meglino Law. Her practice focuses on business owners and employers in various business and employment law matters. This includes making sure businesses are protected and in compliance with business and employment laws. Ms. Meglino also litigates cases including ...

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